Study: Plant-Based Diet May Moderate Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Early Mortality

According to an intriguing new study published by the Journal of Psychosomatic Research, and epublished by the U.S. National Institute of Health, a plant-based diet may moderate the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and early mortality. The study is titled Plant-based dietary intake moderates adverse childhood experiences association with early mortality in an older Adventist cohort.

The study’s abstract begins by noting that “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) consistently predict poor mental and physical health as well as early all-cause mortality.” Although “much work examines health harming behaviors that may be used to cope with ACEs associated stress responses and dysregulation”, researchers state that “limited research has been conducted assessing plant-based dietary intake on the ACEs and mortality relationship.”

With this in mind, researchers state that “The purpose of this study is to examine if the association between ACEs and early mortality is potentially moderated by plant-based dietary intake.”

As part of the study, an observational, prospective cohort study that included 9301 Seventh-day Adventists were assessed from 2006 to 2017 in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS).

Researchers “examined the potential impact of plant-based intake frequency on the ACEs and all-cause mortality relationship, while adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., demographics, health risks, mental and physical health) in a cox regression survival analysis.”

The study found that “ACEs were adversely associated with survival time. Plant-based intake was associated with a reduction in the association of 4+ ACEs with early mortality above and beyond demographics, animal-based intake, physical health, mental health, BMI, exercise, and worship.”

They estimate that “after 4+ ACEs, those eating high versus low plant-based dietary intake may live 5.4 years longer.”

The study concludes by stating that “Plant-based dietary intake may potentially moderate the ACEs and early mortality relationship; however, observational studies cannot determine causality.

 

Below is the study’s abstract in its entirety:

Abstract

Background: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) consistently predict poor mental and physical health as well as early all-cause mortality. Much work examines health harming behaviors that may be used to cope with ACEs associated stress responses and dysregulation. Limited research has been conducted assessing plant-based dietary intake on the ACEs and mortality relationship. We investigate moderators of the ACEs and mortality association including plant-based dietary intake.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine if the association between ACEs and early mortality is potentially moderated by plant-based dietary intake.

Participants: An observational, prospective cohort study that included 9301 Seventh-day Adventists were assessed from 2006 to 2017 in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS).

Methods: We examined the potential impact of plant-based intake frequency on the ACEs and all-cause mortality relationship, while adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., demographics, health risks, mental and physical health) in a cox regression survival analysis.

Results: ACEs were adversely associated with survival time (HR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.15-6.64). Plant-based intake was associated with a reduction in the association of 4+ ACEs with early mortality (HR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59-0.90) above and beyond demographics, animal-based intake, physical health, mental health, BMI, exercise, and worship. We estimate that after 4+ ACEs, those eating high versus low plant-based dietary intake may live 5.4 years longer.

Conclusion: Plant-based dietary intake may potentially moderate the ACEs and early mortality relationship; however, observational studies cannot determine causality.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.