Study: Plant-Based Diets May Improve Complications in Type 2 Diabetes and Obese Patients

According to a new study plant-based diets may improve complications in patients with type 2 diabetes and patients who are obese. The study, published in the journal Nutrition & Metabolism, was also e-published by the National Institute of Health. The study is titled: A plant-based meal reduces postprandial oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in men with diabetes or obesity compared with an energy- and macronutrient-matched conventional meal in a randomized crossover study.

“Increased oxidative/dicarbonyl stress and chronic inflammation are considered key pathophysiological mediators in the progression of complications in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D)”, states the study, which then notes that “Lifestyle and diet composition have a major impact.” In this study, researchers “tested the effects of a vegan (V) and a conventional meat containg (M) meal, matched for energy and macronutrients, on postprandial oxidative and dicarbonyl stress, inflammatory markers and appetite hormones.”

For the study, “A randomised crossover design was used to evaluate T2D, obese with normal glucose tolerance and control participants (n = 20 in each group), with serum concentrations of analytes determined at 0, 120 and 180 min. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis.”

Researchers found that “In T2D subjects, we observed decreased postprandial concentrations of oxidised glutathione (p ˂ 0.001) and increased glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.045) after the V-meal consumption, compared with the M-meal. In obese participants, V-meal consumption increased postprandial concentrations of reduced glutathione (p = 0.041) and decreased methylglyoxal concentrations (p = 0.023).”

In addition, “There were no differences in postprandial secretion of TNFα, MCP-1 or ghrelin in T2D or obese men, but we did observe higher postprandial secretion of leptin after the V-meal in T2D men (p = 0.002) compared with the M-meal.”

The study concludes by stating: “The results show that a plant-based meal is efficient in ameliorating the postprandial oxidative and dicarbonyl stress compared to a conventional energy- and macronutrient-matched meal, indicating the therapeutic potential of plant-based nutrition in improving the progression of complications in T2D and obese patients.”

The full abstract of the study can be found below:

Abstract

Background: Increased oxidative/dicarbonyl stress and chronic inflammation are considered key pathophysiological mediators in the progression of complications in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Lifestyle and diet composition have a major impact. In this study, we tested the effects of a vegan (V) and a conventional meat containg (M) meal, matched for energy and macronutrients, on postprandial oxidative and dicarbonyl stress, inflammatory markers and appetite hormones.

Methods: A randomised crossover design was used to evaluate T2D, obese with normal glucose tolerance and control participants (n = 20 in each group), with serum concentrations of analytes determined at 0, 120 and 180 min. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis.

Results: In T2D subjects, we observed decreased postprandial concentrations of oxidised glutathione (p ˂ 0.001) and increased glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.045) after the V-meal consumption, compared with the M-meal. In obese participants, V-meal consumption increased postprandial concentrations of reduced glutathione (p = 0.041) and decreased methylglyoxal concentrations (p = 0.023). There were no differences in postprandial secretion of TNFα, MCP-1 or ghrelin in T2D or obese men, but we did observe higher postprandial secretion of leptin after the V-meal in T2D men (p = 0.002) compared with the M-meal.

Conclusions: The results show that a plant-based meal is efficient in ameliorating the postprandial oxidative and dicarbonyl stress compared to a conventional energy- and macronutrient-matched meal, indicating the therapeutic potential of plant-based nutrition in improving the progression of complications in T2D and obese patients.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.